Dubliners

James Joyce

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James Joyce’s Dubliners is an enthralling collection of modernist short stories which create a vivid picture of the day-to-day experience of Dublin life. This Penguin Classics edition includes notes and an introduction by Terence Brown.
Joyce’s first major work, written when he was only twenty-five, brought his city to the world for the first time. His stories are rooted in the rich detail of Dublin life, portraying ordinary, often defeated lives with unflinching realism. From ‘The Sisters’, a vivid portrait of childhood faith and guilt, to ‘Araby’, a timeless evocation of the inexplicable yearnings of adolescence, to ‘The Dead’, in which Gabriel Conroy is gradually brought to a painful epiphany regarding the nature of his existence, Joyce draws a realistic and memorable cast of Dubliners together in an powerful exploration of overarching themes. Writing of social decline, sexual desire and exploitation, corruption and personal failure, he creates a brilliantly compelling, unique vision of the world and of human experience.
James Joyce (1882-1941), the eldest of ten children, was born in Dublin, but exiled himself to Paris at twenty as a rebellion against his upbringing. He only returned to Ireland briefly from the continent but Dublin was at heart of his greatest works, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. He lived in poverty until the last ten years of his life and was plagued by near blindness and the grief of his daughter’s mental illness.
If you enjoyed Dubliners, you might like Joyce’s Ulysses, also available in Penguin Modern Classics.
‘Joyce redeems his Dubliners, assures their identity, and makes their social existence appear permanent and immortal, like the streets they walk’
Tom Paulin
‘Joyce’s early short stories remain undimmed in their brilliance’
Sunday Times

$21

In stock

ISBN – 9780141182452
Publisher – Penguin Books, Limited
Format – Paperback
Publication Date – 01/02/2000
Dimensions – 198mm X 130mm
Categories – General Fiction

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James Joyce
Finnegans Wake
Finnegans Wake

A daring work of experimental, Modernist genius, James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake is one of the greatest literary achievements of the twentieth century, and the crowning glory of Joyce’s life. The Penguin Modern Classics edition of includes an introduction by Seamus Deane
‘riverrun, past Eve and Adam’s, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs’
Joyce’s final work, Finnegan’s Wake is his masterpiece of the night as Ulysses is of the day. Supreme linguistic virtuosity conjures up the dark underground worlds of sexuality and dream. Joyce undermines traditional storytelling and all official forms of English and confronts the different kinds of betrayal – cultural, political and sexual – that he saw at the heart of Irish history. Dazzlingly inventive, with passages of great lyrical beauty and humour, Finnegans Wake remains one of the most remarkable works of the twentieth century.
James Joyce (1882-1941), the eldest of ten children, was born in Dublin, but exiled himself to Paris at twenty as a rebellion against his upbringing. He only returned to Ireland briefly from the continent but Dublin was at heart of his greatest works, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. He lived in poverty until the last ten years of his life and was plagued by near blindness and the grief of his daughter’s mental illness.
If you enjoyed Finnegans Wake, you might like Virginia Woolf’s The Waves, also available in Penguin Classics.
‘An extraordinary performance, a transcription into a miniaturized form of the whole western literary tradition’
Seamus Deane

$31

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Ulysses
Ulysses

‘Everybody knows now that Ulysses is the greatest novel of the century’ Anthony Burgess, Observer

Following the events of one single day in Dublin, the 16th June 1904, and what happens to the characters Stephen Dedalus, Leopold Bloom and his wife Molly, Ulysses is a monument to the human condition. It has survived censorship, controversy and legal action, and even been deemed blasphemous, but remains an undisputed modernist classic- ceaselessly inventive, garrulous, funny, sorrowful, vulgar, lyrical and ultimately redemptive. It confirms Joyce’s belief that literature ‘is the eternal affirmation of the spirit of man’.

‘The most important expression which the present age has found; it is a book to which we are all indebted, and from which none of us can escape’ T. S. Eliot

‘Intoxicating … a towering work, in its word play surpassing even Shakespeare’ Guardian

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A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man

Playful and experimental, James Joyce’s autobiographical A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a vivid portrayal of emotional and intellectual development. This Penguin Modern Classics edition is edited with an introduction and notes by Seamus Deane.

The portrayal of Stephen Dedalus’s Dublin childhood and youth, his quest for identity through art and his gradual emancipation from the claims of family, religion and Ireland itself, is also an oblique self-portrait of the young James Joyce and a universal testament to the artist’s ‘eternal imagination’. Both an insight into Joyce’s life and childhood, and a unique work of modernist fiction, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a novel of sexual awakening, religious rebellion and the essential search for voice and meaning that every nascent artist must face in order to fully come into themselves.

James Joyce (1882-1941), the eldest of ten children, was born in Dublin, but exiled himself to Paris at twenty as a rebellion against his upbringing. He only returned to Ireland briefly from the continent but Dublin was at heart of his greatest works, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. He lived in poverty until the last ten years of his life and was plagued by near blindness and the grief of his daughter’s mental illness.

If you enjoyed A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, you might like Joyce’s Dubliners, also available in Penguin Modern Classics.

‘There is nothing more vivid or beautiful in all Joyce’s writing. It has the searing clarity of truth … but is rich with myth and symbol’
Sunday Times

‘James Joyce was and remains almost unique among novelists in that he published nothing but masterpieces’
The Times Literary Supplement

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