Living with the Gods

Neil Macgregor

$70

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The panoramic new history of belief from the celebrated author of A History of the World in 100 Objects.

No society on Earth lacks beliefs about where it has come from, its place in the world, and the connection of individuals to the eternal. Until recently, it was widely assumed that religion was on the wane almost everywhere- now, far from becoming marginalised, the relationship between faith and society has moved to the centre of politics and global conversation. Neil MacGregor’s new book and radio series, and the parallel exhibition at the British Museum, trace how different societies have understood and articulated their place in the cosmic scheme. He examines mankind’s beliefs not from the perspective of institutional religions, but by focusing on the shared narratives that have shaped societies – and on what happens when different narratives run up against each other. MacGregor brilliantly turns his kaleidoscope of objects, monuments and ideas to set these pressing contemporary concerns in the long perspectives of time and place.

$70

In stock

ISBN – 9780241308295
Publisher – Penguin Books, Limited
Format – Hardback
Publication Date – 17/09/2018
Dimensions – 238mm X 166mm
Categories – Death Spirituality and Ghosts

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Neil Macgregor
Germany Memories of a Nation

For the past 140 years, Germany has been the central power in continental Europe. Twenty-five years ago a new German state came into being. How much do we really understand this new Germany, and how do its people now understand themselves?

From Neil MacGregor, the author of A History of the World in 100 Objects, this is a view of Germany like no other

For the past 140 years, Germany has been the central power in continental Europe. Twenty-five years ago a new German state came into being. How much do we really understand this new Germany, and how do its people now understand themselves?
Neil MacGregor argues that uniquely for any European country, no coherent, over-arching narrative of Germany’s history can be constructed, for in Germany both geography and history have always been unstable. Its frontiers have constantly floated. K nigsberg, home to the greatest German philosopher, Immanuel Kant, is now Kaliningrad, Russia; Strasbourg, in whose cathedral Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Germany’s greatest writer, discovered the distinctiveness of his country’s art and history, now lies within the borders of France. For most of the five hundred years covered by this book Germany has been composed of many separate political units, each with a distinct history. And any comfortable national story Germans might have told themselves before 1914 was destroyed by the events of the following thirty years.
German history may be inherently fragmented, but it contains a large number of widely shared memories, awarenesses and experiences; examining some of these is the purpose of this book. Beginning with the fifteenth-century invention of modern printing by Gutenberg, MacGregor chooses objects and ideas, people and places which still resonate in the new Germany – porcelain from Dresden and rubble from its ruins, Bauhaus design and the German sausage, the crown of Charlemagne and the gates of Buchenwald – to show us something of its collective imagination. There has never been a book about Germany quite like it.

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A History of the World in 100 Objects

Neil MacGregor’s A History of the World in 100 Objects takes a bold, original approach to human history, exploring past civilizations through the objects that defined them.

Encompassing a grand sweep of human history, A History of the World in 100 Objects begins with one of the earliest surviving objects made by human hands, a chopping tool from the Olduvai gorge in Africa, and ends with objects which characterise the world we live in today.

Seen through MacGregor’s eyes, history is a kaleidoscope – shifting, interconnected, constantly surprising, and shaping our world today in ways that most of us have never imagined. A stone pillar tells us about a great Indian emperor preaching tolerance to his people; Spanish pieces of eight tell us about the beginning of a global currency; and an early Victorian tea-set speaks to us about the impact of empire.

An intellectual and visual feast, this is one of the most engrossing and unusual history books published in years.

‘Brilliant, engagingly written, deeply researched’ Mary Beard, Guardian

‘A triumph: hugely popular, and rightly lauded as one of the most effective and intellectually ambitious initiatives in the making of ‘public history’ for many decades’ Sunday Telegraph

‘Highly intelligent, delightfully written and utterly absorbing ‘ Timothy Clifford, Spectator

‘This is a story book, vivid and witty, shining with insights, connections, shocks and delights’ Gillian Reynolds Daily Telegraph

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